BIOGRAPHIES OF TRAILL COUNTY
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MARSHALL J. AKINS

Marshall was born December 17, 1844 and died 26 December 1917 in Florida.
He enlisted as a Private from Pennsylvania on 27 August 1861 into Company I, Pennsylvania 83rd Infantry Regiment. He mustered out on 24 December 1861. He enlisted again as a Corporal from Wisconsin on 18 March 1864 into Company F, Wisconsin 36th Infantry Regiment. He mustered out on 12 July 1865 at Jeffersonville, Kentucky. He started receiving a pension on 15 January 1876 and his wife, Emma, starting receiving a widow's pension 21 January 1918 in Florida.
In the 1880 Dakota Territory Census he is in Cass County and in the 1890 Veterans Federal Census and the 1900 Federal Census he is in Portland.
He is buried in Palm Beach County, Florida.
Burial, Tombstone Picture.
GEORGE HENRY AMES

George was born May 1847 and died 15 January 1915 in Minnesota.
He enlisted as a Private from Wisconsin on 30 January 1865 into Company E, 47th Wisconsin Infantry Regiment. He mustered out on 4 September 1865 at Nashville, Tennessee.
In the 1890 Veterans Federal Census he is in Portland.
He is buried in Clearwater County, Minnesota.
Burial, Tombstone Picture.
GUNDER C. ANDERSON

Some records have his surname as Andersen.
Gunder was born about 1834 in Norway and died 18 July 1893 in the Milwaukee, Wisconsin Soldiers Home.
He enlisted as a Private from Wisconsin on 7 October 1861 into Company F, 12th Wisconsin Infantry Regiment. He mustered out on 16 July 1865. He started receiving his pension in North Dakota on 26 November 1890.
In the 1885 Dakota Territory Census he is in Traill County.
From Norwegians in the Civil War; Vesterheim Norwegian-American Museum: "ANDERSON, Gunder C. WI 12th Inf Co F. Residence: Manitowoc, Manitowoc County, Wisconsin. Born at Gunster, Norway. Civil War: Age 27. Laborer. Unmarried. Blue eyes, light hair, light complexion, 5’10¾”. Enlisted for three years on 7 Oct 1861 at Oconto, Wisconsin. Mustered 5 Nov 1861 at Madison, Wisconsin. Private. Re-enlisted for three years on 2 Jan 1864 at Natchez, Mississippi. “Was a good soldier. Never absent or sick from his command and always ready and willing for duty.” Took part in actions at Lamar, Cold water, Vicksburg, Jackson, the Meridian expedition in Mississippi; the campaign for Alworth station, to the surrender of Atlanta; Jonesboro, the campaign through Georgia, the surrender of Savannah, Georgia; the campaign through the Carolinas. Post war: Moved from Wisconsin to Traill County, North Dakota, in April 1879. Sources: (WHS Series 1200 box 58-14,15; red book vol 17, p102) (Traill County Veterans Index, 1885 Dakota Territorial Census) “Andersen, Gunder”."
Gunder held a land patent in Section 26, Township 147, Range 52 (Mayville area).
He is buried in Milwaukee County, Wisconsin.
Burial, Tombstone Picture.
MAGNUS ANDERSON

Magnus was born 25 October 1848 in Norway and died 11 February 1928 in Foster County.
He enlisted as a Private from Iowa on 1 October 1864 into Company B, 27th Iowa Infantry Regiment. He transferred to Company B, 12th Iowa Infantry Regiment on 3 July 1865. He mustered out on 24 November 1865 at Mobile, Alabama. He started receiving his pension in North Dakota on 10 June 1891 and his wife, Angenette, started receiving a widow's pension on 16 March 1928.
In the 1890 Veterans Federal Census and in the 1900 Federal census he is in Mayville and in the 1910 and 1920 Federal Census he is in Foster County.
From Norwegians in the Civil War; Vesterheim Norwegian-American Museum: "ANDERSON, Magnus IA 27th Inf Co B. Residence: Lansing, Iowa. Born in Voss, Norway. Civil War: Age 16. Enlisted in June 1862. Private. Re-enlisted 13 Oct 1864 and re-mustered 23 Oct 1864. Transferred to IA 12th Inf Co B, 13 Jul 1865. Was a prisoner in Andersonville, Georgia. Mustered out 24 Nov 1865, Mobile, Alabama. Post war: He moved from Iowa to Mayville, Traill County, North Dakota, in May 1879. Sources: (ISW-II p419; ISW-III p1130) (Ulvestad p268) (Traill County Veterans Index, 1885 Dakota Territory Census) (1890 Veterans and Widows Census, North Dakota, No.123, roll 59)."
Magnus held land patents in Section 18, Township 147, Range 53 (Portland area).
NELS C. ANDERSON

North Dakota History and People - Outlines of American History
Volume II
The E. J. Clarke Publishing Company
1917 - Chicago

N. C. Anderson is now living retired at Clifford but for a long period was actively engaged in general farming and in other business interests, wherein his carefully directed labors and sound business judgment brought him substantial success. Mr. Anderson was born in Sweden, April 30, 1841, a son of Anders Carlson and Carrie Larson. The mother died in Sweden and in 1873 the father followed his sons to the United States, spending his last days in Minnesota, where he passed away in 1876.
N. C. Anderson acquired his education in the public schools of Sweden and spent his youthful days under the parental roof but in 1870 came to the United States, attracted by the almost limitless opportunities here offered to the energetic and ambitious young man. He settled first at Meeker, Minnesota, but during the succeeding nine years drifted around, working at various occupations in that state, in Iowa, and in Ontario, Canada. In 1879, however, he took up his permanent abode in North Dakota, journeying across the country from Clear Lake, Iowa, with his wife and two children, in a covered wagon drawn by a team of horses. It was his intention to homestead in this state but on reaching Fargo he found that he had but seven dollars and a half. Winter was coming on and he and his wife decided that their small capital was hardly sufficient to enable them to spend the winter on the homestead and they decided to remain in the city, where Mr. Anderson might secure employment. He obtained work at carpentering, although he had not been trained to the trade, and his first job netted him twenty dollars. Later he took out a drayman's license and for two years was engaged in the draying business, during which time he purchased a lot, whereon he erected a frame dwelling. Immediately afterward he and his wife began keeping boarders and prospered in the undertaking. In 1880 he began the construction of a brick house, which adjoins the old Central Hotel on First avenue North and is still standing. This was the first house built on that street. In that building for six years Mr. Anderson conducted a hotel under the name of the Red River House, it being one of the popular hostelries of Fargo. In 1885 he sold his hotel and removed to his farm in Norman township, Traill county, which he had purchased in 1883 and to his original quarter section he added from time to time until he owned a full section. In 1893 he purchased the section on which the town of Clifford now stands and at that time he owned two sections, or twelve hundred and eighty acres of valuable North Dakota land. Since then, however, he has sold five quarter sections and now owns but four hundred and eighty acres of the original tract. He carried on farming with success for a number of years but about 1903 left the farm and took up his abode in Clifford, where he has since lived retired. He is a stockholder in the Clifford Farmers Elevator Company.
In 1877 Mr. Anderson was married to Miss Carrie Johnson, a native of Sweden, the marriage ceremony being performed in Canada. This union has been blessed with six children but only three survive, as follows: Victoria, the wife of John Nelson, a farmer of Norman township, Traill county; Nels, who follows farming in Montana; and William, who operates the homestead farm. The wife and mother passed away March 31, 1912.
In politics Mr. Anderson is a republican but is liberal in his views and at local elections casts his ballot for the men whom he deems best qualified for office rather than for party. He served as chairman of the town board while living on the farm for a period of ten years and for a number of years was assessor and also a member of the school board. In early days in Korman township, Traill county, he was one of the dominant factors in building schoolhouses and establishing a system of education. He holds membership in the Church of the Latter Day Saints. In 1913 Mr. Anderson made a trip back to Sweden, which was the first time he had visited his native country in forty-three years. His unfaltering industry and his business ability have brought him substantial success as the years have gone on. He worked persistently and energetically and as the years have passed his business affairs have been so carefully and wisely directed that success in substantial measure has come to him, enabling him now to rest from further labor and enjoy the fruits of his former toil.
[Note: Nels C. Anderson's Burial] <
THOMAS GEORGE ANDERSON

Thomas was born 21 June 1842 and died 21 September 1915 in Cass County but as a resident of Steele County.
He enlisted as a Corporal from Indiana on 17 July 1862 into Company A, Indiana 74th Indiana Infantry Regiment. He mustered out on 5 March 1863. He started receiving his pension in North Dakota on 14 January 1891 and his wife, Bess, starting receiving a widow's pension on 18 October 1925 in North Dakota.
In the 1890 Veterans Federal Census he is in Portland and in the 1900 Federal Census he is in Steele County.
From Norwegians in the Civil War; Vesterheim Norwegian-American Museum: "ANDERSON, Thomas G. IN 74th Inf Co A. Civil War: Enlisted 16 Jul 1862. Corporal. Discharged 10 Mar 1863. In 1890, he was living in Portland, Traill County, North Dakota. Sources: (1890 Veterans and Widows Census, North Dakota, No.123, roll 59)."
He is buried in Sherbrooke Cemetery, Steele County.
Burial, Tombstone Picture.
ALVIN L. ARNOLD

Alvin was born 10 July 1833 and died 6 April 1891 in Traill County.
He enlisted as a Corporal from Indiana on 1 December 1861 into Company B, Indiana 51st Indiana Infantry Regiment. He mustered out on 14 December 1864. He started receiving his pension in North Dakota on 30 June 1890 and his wife, Helen, starting receiving a widow's pension on 16 February 1892 in North Dakota. The Portland History 1882-1957 and the Mayville-Portland History have more information, biographies, and pictures of Alvin and his family.
He is buried in Aurdal Cemetery. Burial, Tombstone Picture, Portrait.
JOHAN ALBERT JONSON AUSTRING

Johan was born on 14 May 1865 in Steinland gård #58, Øksnes, Vesterålen, Nordland, Norway. He Census Info Johan A Johnsen in Dec 1865 in Steinland gård #58, Øksnes, Vesterålen, Nordland, Norway. He Census Info Johan Johnsen, Forsørges af Faderen in 1875 in Våje/Våge gård #44, Øksnes, Vesterålen, Nordland, Norway. He Census Info Johan Johnsen, Fisker og Gaardbruger Selveier in 1900 in Austringen gård #25, Øksnes, Vesterålen, Nordland, Norway. He immigrated in 1902 to Clifford, Traill Co, North Dakota, USA. He was naturalised on 28 Oct 1903 in Clifford, Traill Co, North Dakota, USA. He immigrated about Apr 1907 to Swift Current, Saskatchewan, Canada."John Austring and Pete Thodesen came to Canada in about 1905, and found homestead land. They filed by proxy for all of us. We all got land--Dad, John, Ingvald and I. John hadn't even seen the land, but a friend had picked it out for him. In the spring of 1907 the rest of the family came to Canada, leaving Ingvald and me at Clifford to finish up farming operations on some land we had rented. We had a good but late crop at Clifford that year. We then rented two railroad cars to haul our stuff to Canada. We had horses, cattle and machinery in those cars. We came via Winnipeg and arrived in Waldeck on Sunday, December 1, 1907. We were met by our brother John. I remember the weather was nice. There was no snow on the ground. We drove out on the "Norwegian Trail" from Waldeck to Nordland district. It was a thrill to arrive and stand on a piece of ground I could call my own. The house had already been built and the basement dug by the time we got there, so we moved right in. At Nordland that first year we were hard-pressed for money, but you see we had cows and chickens. We were able to sell some butter. Otherwise it took a while to get farming going." He died on 8 Dec 1949 in Swift Current, Saskatchewan, Canada. He was married to Petra Maren* REINHOLDTSEN about 1884 in Åsen gård #58, Øksnes, Vesterålen, Nordland, Norway. "The Austring family originally lived in a fishing cove on Vesterålen islands in North Norway. The place was called Austring, meaning an "east ring," or bend, in the bay. The house we lived in was a large one, and fairly typical of that time. It had been built of timber, with birch bark shingles on the roof which was then covered with sod thatching. Grass actually grew on top of the roof.

"We lived right on the shore, so spent a lot of time in boats, fishing. My father owned a store at the seaside but it wasn't too prosperous so he also had to fish. Fishing was a rough kind of life. I remember many storms. One comes to mind very much. Ingvald and I were caught in high waves. We kept bailing out water, hoping to get to shore somehow. We were finally rescued by some strong men who saw us from shore.

Extracted from the Internet/Rootsweb Files of Diana M. Austring, of Aotearoa, New Zealand.


JOHN KILDAHL AUSTRING

John Kildahl AUSTRING was born in 1885 in Våje/Våge gård #44, Øksnes, Vesterålen, Nordland, Norway. He Census Info John Johnsen, Fisker in 1900 in Austringen gård #25, Øksnes, Vesterålen, Nordland, Norway. He immigrated in 1902 to Clifford, Traill Co, North Dakota, USA. He immigrated in 1905 to Swift Current, Saskatchewan, Canada. He died on 16 May 1976 in Haney, British Columbia, Canada.

Extracted from the Internet/Rootsweb Files of Diana M. Austring, of Aotearoa, New Zealand.


TORSTEN SEVERIN AUSTRING

Torsten Severin AUSTRING was born in 1886 in Våje/Våge gård #44, Øksnes, Vesterålen, Nordland, Norway. He Census Info Torstein Johnsen, Fisker in 1900 in Austringen gård #25, Øksnes, Vesterålen, Nordland, Norway. He immigrated in 1902 to Clifford, Traill Co, North Dakota, USA. "At the time we left Norway times were difficult. It was difficult to make a living. We had a letter from Uncle Ove Woie, who lived in North Dakota, USA. He offered to send us tickets, that is, for the three of us, to come to America. My father, my brother John and I left Norway on June 1902. We arrived during haying time in Clifford, North Dakota. I remember how hot the weather was during that haying time, in comparison to the coolness of North Norway. We involved ourselves in the work of pitching hay after we arrived. Did we do a lot of sweating!

"We had traveled by ship, going via Hull and Liverpool. We stayed in Liverpool one week. That was during the time of the Boer Wars. We had to wait for travel. We spent the week trying to talk to the English boys, but of course couldn't speak much English. I remember we became their friends when we finally learned to play soldiers and shouted 'Bang the Boers!'

"We crossed the Atlantic during a bad storm. The waves came like walls of water onto the deck. I can't remember how long it took to get to New York, but I do remember getting over my seasickness. I used to have trouble with that in the smaller boats when my father went fishing. From New York we went by train to Minneapolis. My brother John had lost his identification tag there. He picked up just an ordinary tag to use if asked for it. We took another train to Clifford, North Dakota. Our uncle met us on the train. He had been to Minneapolis to see Pete Thodesen, who had been ill and was in bad shape. He just happened to be on the same train going to Clifford. He took over from there and we were in good hands." "Greetings!

"I am researching Pentecostal church history in North Dakota, USA, and am looking for information on Thorsten S Austring. Austring was a Canadian evangelist who held summer services in Traill County, ND while visiting relatives (possibly the Overmoen family), over a period of many years, possibly from the 1920s-1950s. He also pastored Full Gospel Mission in Minot, ND. Minot Daily News adverts list him as pastor from 1948-50. His tenure may have been longer, I cannot tell from the absence of adverts.

"I would love to find info on his religious background, conversion, ministry, and family, and anything relating to ND. I understand he was a Oneness, or non-trinitarian, and a Calvinist. Was he a member of the Apostolic Church of Pentecost of Canada?"

Darrin Rodgers <darrin_rodgers@und.nodak.edu>

Reply from: Dr Doris Nelson <danelson@telusplanet.net>

"I am assuming you are writing a paper at University, so I took pains to collect a bit of legitimate information for you. Here goes:

"My uncle Thorstein spent his last years living with my parents, Jacob & Agnes (nee Austring) Nelson. He was born in North Norway, in Vesterålen area. He was baptized, and probably confirmed at the Lutheran parish of Øksnes, where his parents worshipped. He came to North Dakota with one of his brothers and his father. His father, J.J. Austring, had a half brother, Ove Woie, living and farming in Clifford, N. D. (Trail County). >From there J.J. Austring sent for his wife and the rest of the family, who soon arrived. They spent 1-2 years at Clifford, then went to Saskatchewan, Canada, where they took homesteads. Thorstein donated the land for the Nordland Lutheran Church and Cemetery, on NE 18-19-12-W3rd. His first wife was buried there, and he also chose to be buried there.

"He was farming north of Swift Current, SK and had married in 1913 to a widow Anna Olson Carlson, who had 4 children. He came under the influence of a charismatic movement in his early thirties. It is thought that the movement started in Winnipeg by a pastor-evangelist Frank Small. The movement came to Winnipeg from the United States. At that time Evangelistic meetings were held in huge tents in "Gospel Camps", and one was situated near the farming community in which the Austrings lived.
Another member of the community was also influenced by the group, as they arrived about the time of his wife's death. He started a church in an adjoining district, and called it the "Church of Philadelphia". These two young farmers were probably a support for one another in this otherwise Lutheran community. Some of the stories we children heard from our mother, and aunts, (who were Thorstein's sisters,) certainly indicated that their way of expressing their new-found beliefs could be counted as quite radical. My Grandparents, (Thorstein's parents) lived with us in some of their last years. My grandmother was a devout believer, and read her Bible faithfully. I still remember seeing the thumb-oil-stains through the pages of her Bible where she held the pages. To hear that her son had had a ceremonial burning of his mother's Lutheran" books is difficult for me to understand. It was something the book of Acts (his interpretation) had inspired him to do.

"Uncle Thorstein left his farming, in 1920 to become a "Pioneer Evangelist". He had no formal training at the time, and declared that if he would just "open his mouth the Holy Spirit will fill it with words." His Obituary in 1978 indicated that he had been in the ministry from 1925 - 1952, had run 20 Gospel Camp Meetings, and had parishes in North Dakota; Winnipeg, Manitoba; Morse, Sask; Hodgeville, Sask; Killdeer, Sask; St Boswells, Sask. The Obituary was written by Rev. Larden, of the Apostolic Church in Swift Current, Sask.

"My sister's husband played the piano for Uncle Thorstein's Camp Meetings in 1930-31 where Rev. Reynolds in charge. My brother-i-law's parents were of the Apostolic Church of Pentecost, and continued to worship at that church in Swift Current until their death. They were quiet believers, and definitely not radical thinkers.

"Uncle Thorstein embraced the "Jesus Only" belief, and was known to rebaptize anyone who had been baptized in the name of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.

"Uncle Thorstein's first wife died in 1951, and, in 1962, he remarried a widow Katharine. She had 8 adult children. They lived in Morse, Sask for some time. She died in 1971. Uncle Thorstein moved back to Swift Current, and lived in the basement suite of my parents' home. He died in 1978 at the age of 92. He had pleaded with the Lord, and sometimes demanded of the Lord, to take him home. He had finished his work.

"The relatives he visited in Trail County were: Ludwig Carlson, his stepson, now living in Mayville, ND; Ove Woie & family, his father's half-brother. Their father was Jon Olsen, in Norway, and J.J. Austring was Johan Jonsen, but took the place name in Norway where he last lived. Uncle Ove was Ove Jonsen, and he took the place name where he last lived. The Woie family is represented now by the Thompsons in Trail County. One of Ove's daughters married a Thompson. I am not acquainted with any Overmoen family.

"You said you wanted to know about his family. He and wife Anna adopted a daughter. Her name is Esther, and she lives in Midale, Sask. She has a large family. Otherwise Thorstein's family was the extended families of the Austrings. They are almost innumerable. I actually have had over 100 first cousins. The number of persons living out their Christian faith is phenomenal, and they represent a range of denominations! He was a member of the Apostolic Church of Pentecost of Canada. I do not know when he became a member, as he started out in the ministry as a free-lancer I believe.

"Sincerely, Doris A Nelson"

Extracted from the Internet/Rootsweb Files of Diana M. Austring, of Aotearoa, New Zealand.